Soft Tissue

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Figures 827832 Barium meal in the cat. Right lateral recumbent and ventrodorsal projections of abdomen. Radiographs taken during restraint with sandbags before and following oral administration of liquid barium sulphate. British Domestic Short Haired cat adult (same cat in all figures for barium meal).


This barium meal series was not followed beyond the transverse colon. Note that the caecum is not identifiable in any of the films; in the cat it is a very small, simple sac compared with that of the dog.



Figure 828 Immediately after barium administration. Right lateral recumbent projection of abdomen. (Approximately 80% of original size.)
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Very little barium is left in the oesophagus and it is just beginning to pass down the descending portion of the duodenum.


1 Oesophagus


2 Cardia of the stomach


3 Fundus of the stomach


4 Body of the fundus


5 Pyloric antrum


6 Pyloric canal


7 Cranial flexure of the duodenum



Figure 829 15 minutes after barium administration. Ventrodorsal projection of abdomen. (Approximately 110% of original size.)
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Rugal folds of the stomach wall are seen in cross-section (arrows) around the fundic pool of barium, with streaking of barium along their length.


Note that the cat stomach is more ‘J’-shaped in this projection than is the dog’s, with the pylorus closer to the midline.


Bubbles of gas are present within the jejunal loops and gas appears to be collecting within the colon highlighting the faecal boluses.


3 Fundus of the stomach


4 Body of the stomach


5 Pyloric antrum


6 Pyloric canal


7 Cranial flexure of the duodenum


8 Descending portion of the duodenum


9 Caudal flexure of the duodenum


10 Ascending portion of the duodenum


11 Duodenojejunal flexure


12 Loops of jejunum and ileum



Figure 830 75 minutes after barium administration. Right lateral recumbent projection of abdomen. (Approximately 80% of original size.)
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Only a trace of barium remains in the stomach and it is already collecting in the colon, coating the faecal boluses.


7 Cranial flexure of the duodenum


8 Descending portion of the duodenum


9 Caudal flexure of the duodenum


12 Loops of jejunum and ileum


13 Ileocolic junction


14 Ascending colon


15 Right colic flexure


16 Transverse colon



Figure 831 75 minutes after barium administration. Ventrodorsal projection of abdomen. (Approximately 100% of original size.)
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3 Fundus of the stomach


8 Descending portion of the duodenum


12 Loops of jejunum and ileum


13 Ileocolic junction


14 Ascending colon


See right lateral recumbent projection of abdomen, Figure 830, also at 75 minutes.



Figure 832 3 hours after barium administration. Right lateral recumbent projection of abdomen. (Approximately 90% of original size.)
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The barium is almost totally in the colon although transit has stopped at a similar level as in the 75-minute film. It is probably being held up by the faecal boluses and the accumulation of gas which has occurred.


13 Ileocolic junction


14 Ascending colon


15 Right colic flexure


16 Transverse colon


Oesophogram: Figure 833


Right lateral recumbent thorax projection



Figure 833 Normal appearance of liquid barium within the thoracic oesophagus of the cat. Right lateral recumbent projection of thorax. Radiograph taken during restraint with sandbags immediately following oral administration of liquid barium sulphate as part of a barium meal investigation. British Domestic Short Haired cat adult. (Approximately 120% of original size.)
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Caudal to the base of the heart longitudinal striations, up to this point similar to the dog, give way to a ‘herring bone’ pattern reflecting the obliquely directed folds of mucosa. The latter corresponds to the change to smooth muscle in the wall of this segment of the cat’soesophagus.


Barium meal pitfalls: Figure 834835


Gastric relux: Figure 834



Figure 834 Gastric reflux of liquid barium. Right lateral projection of thorax. Radiograph taken during restraint with sandbags 1 minute following oral administration of liquid barium sulphate as part of a barium meal investigation. British Domestic Short Haired cat adult. (Approximately 160% of original size.)
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A volume of barium is present within the distal oesophageal lumen, due to the immediate reflux of barium from the gastric fundus into the oesophagus. Such a reflux is sometimes seen in both the cat and the dog. It is not considered clinically significant unless the reflux is prolonged and/or the oesophageal shadow shows abnormality.


Duodenal beading and pseudostringing: Figure 835



Figure 835 Duodenal beading and pseudostringing in the cat. Ventrodorsal projection of abdomen. Radiograph taken during restraint with sandbags 5 minutes after oral administration of liquid barium sulphate as part of a barium meal investigation. British Domestic Short Haired cat adult. (Approximately 120% of original size.)
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Jun 23, 2017 | Posted by in ANIMAL RADIOLOGY | Comments Off on Soft Tissue
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