Anesthetic Considerations for Dental Prophylaxis and Oral Surgery

Chapter 28
Anesthetic Considerations for Dental Prophylaxis and Oral Surgery


From bad breath to pearly whites


Jason W. Soukup and Lesley J. Smith


Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, USA



  1. Q. Who is my “typical” patient presenting for a dental prophylaxis?
  2. A. The most common patients that require dental cleanings are middle-aged to geriatric dogs and cats who have achieved their owner’s attention because they have significant halitosis or have demonstrated a reduction in appetite or a change in chewing behavior. Because many of these patients are of a more “advanced” age, co-morbidities associated with aging should be considered. These patients should receive a thorough physical examination and bloodwork as indicated based on breed, history, physical exam findings, concurrent medications, and so on.

    In general, geriatric patients have reduced organ “reserve,” which means that they tolerate the physiologic insults of general anesthesia more poorly than young robust patients. Close attention to monitoring of blood pressure, heart rate, oxygenation, ventilation, and temperature are imperative in order to ensure a successful outcome and recovery from anesthesia.

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Sep 3, 2017 | Posted by in SMALL ANIMAL | Comments Off on Anesthetic Considerations for Dental Prophylaxis and Oral Surgery
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